The Eastern Bluebird

One of the prettiest birds you’ll see on our campus is the Eastern Bluebird:

The Eastern Bluebird

 

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What they look like:  The Eastern Bluebird is a thrush, related to the American Robin and the Wood Thrush. A male would have a blue head, back and tail, but then light brown covering its chest and white covering the rest of its body. Their eyes are usually black, but sometimes some brown shows on the edges.

Where you’ll see him:  This type of thrush quite enjoys the bottom branches of oak and pine trees in our forest. You will probably see one in either of the forests surrounding our school. Eastern Bluebirds do not travel in groups or packs, so it’s normal to see them on their own or with one or two others.

What he eats:  These bluebirds are omnivores, so they mostly eat small insects, worms, caterpillars, seeds & fruits.

What he sounds like:  Eastern Bluebirds sing a warbling song made up of usually 1-3 notes.  You can listen to their calls here. They sing these low-pitched notes about three times. If you hear a loud version of this song, it’s probably a female in danger. A soft song is a male trying to mate or tell other males that the area is already “taken”.

Where you can learn more about him: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Bluebird
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/eastern_bluebird/sounds/ac

By Ryan M.

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American Crow

One of the most annoying birds you’ll find on the Salem Middle School campus is the American Crow:

600px-corvus-brachyrhynchos-001

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What he looks like: He looks surprisingly like a Common Raven, which also happens to live in North Carolina. The only two differences in shape are the crow’s beak and tail. The crow’s beak is slightly curved and smaller than the raven’s. The tail is more squared and boxy than the raven as well. The crow’s entire body is either black or gray. A crow egg is a tan color with white splotches all over. These eggs are usually about 2 inches longer than a chicken egg.

Where you’ll see him: The American crow is found in the trees and occasionally near the ground on rocks and bushes. You’ll probably see him up in the tall pine trees in the forest at our school. We’ve seen him in the forest behind the bus loop and the woods behind the pond near the back of our school. It is very unlikely that you will see a crow on its own. We’ve seen them in groups of anywhere from 2 to 9. This group strangely is called a murder.

What they eat:  They are omnivores, so here they eat seeds, nuts and eggs. Near the ground, they usually eat dead mice, frogs, fish and many other types of carrion. It is very rare, but the American crow also eats small insects.

What he sounds like: You’ve probably heard an American crow’s call — which you can listen to here — sometime in the last week.  They live all around our school, and call their annoying caaw-caaw-caaws all day long. When they call, they thrust their abdomen and head forward, letting out a loud call. I hate to bring up bad thoughts, but you could think of it as a vomiting motion.

 

Where you can learn more about him: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Crow

 

Summary by Ryan M.

Rufous Sided Towhee

One of the most interesting birds on the Salem Middle School campus is the Rufous Sided Towhee:

Towhee

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What he looks like:  A robin.  In fact, when we first saw him, we thought he WAS a robin!  That’s a common mistake because his sides and wings are a brownish-red.  If you look closely, though, you’ll notice that he has a black head and a white belly.  You’ll also notice that he has a long, retangular tail.  Those are the best ways to identify him — and to tell him apart from a robin. 

Where you’ll see him:  Near the ground.  The Towhee digs and scratches under leaves and bark looking for food.  It also builds its nests either on — or very close to — the ground.  Here at Salem, we’ve seen him under the bushes near the outdoor classroom and under the bushes along the fence near the bus loop. 

What he sounds like: People say that his call — which you can listen to here — sounds a lot like the phrase “Drink your tea.”  In fact, the “tea” sound at the end of his call is where he got his last name from.  Now, you’ve got to do some imagining to hear “Drink your tea” in his call.  The first hard sound is the “Drink.”  The last drawn out sound in his call — “te-ee-ee-ee” — is the “tea.”

Where you can learn more about him:  We found this article on the Wikipedia website to be helpful.